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In many cases, a below-slab perimeter drain leading to a sump pit with at least two pumps (primary and backup) is the answer. The sump pit should be installed in the lowest part of the room perimeter and set-up to discharge water outside in the most efficient manner. Many finished basements build a closet around the sump pit. Regardless of how you conceal it, be sure to allow for easy access.
Any project involving electrical, plumbing, or turning the basement into a livable space, requires permits. Plumbing must be done to code for proper drainage to avoid health issues. It also has to ensure flushing certain waste back into the sewer. Electrical issues can cause short-circuits, blown breakers, and fires. The chance of something happening increases if installation is not done properly from the start, including acquiring the proper permits. If creating a bedroom or other regular living space, permits are required. Emergency escape avenues (for fire and other emergencies) need to be in place as well.
You can even purchase basement design software to help you design your basement. Basement design software allows you to virtually build and design your basement yourself and is a great way to plan out your basement remodeling ideas. You can also hire a basement contractor to help you with your basement remodeling. A basement contractor will not only help you with your design but will also be able to give you an idea of the basement finishing costs. After finishing basement walls you can start looking at paint options. You can the same color paint as the rest of your home to ensure that basement paint matches the rest of your house.
Your stairs are the first thing guests will see when they walk down into your finished basement. Give them something to talk about with a staircase that’s one of a kind. Create suspended steps, light-up steps, or glass side panels. Or make smaller changes by installing patterned carpet, decorative tiles, or a unique railing. Looking for more cool staircase designs? Check out these under the stairs ideas!
Basements are ideal for casual social activities for the whole family, or just for the kids. It's the perfect spot for the big screen TV, pool table, and to stash board games and craft supplies. Make this space inviting by finishing and decorating it like any upstairs room. Choose comfortable furnishings that can be easily rearranged to accommodate a few people or a crowd. Incorporate sound systems, internet connections, and good lighting to make the basement design functional.

If you are going for a movie screening room, then go with a dark neutral, or simply go dark. You want the walls to recede and you don’t want a lot of glare from your projection equipment or tv. Make sure to use a flat paint and paint the ceiling in a dark neutral to prevent light from bouncing around and creating glares. For a classic, old world move theater feeling, go with a rich burgundy or deep navy.
The cost of a basement remodel can vary, but in most cases, this project won’t be cheap. What you put into your basement remodel is what you will get out of it, so that initial payment can turn into a terrific return on investment. The average basement remodel will increase your home’s resale value. Next to kitchen and bathrooms, basements are ranked as one of the most valuable home renovations.
When it comes to basement remodels, the most costly way is to start with bare bones. If all you have is concrete walls and floors, you need to add framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring and trim. Basement finishing in a newer home that already has plumbing and electrical roughed in, a watertight foundation and some insulation installed—but no final finishes (like drywall or paint or carpet)—usually costs less than remodeling an already finished basement. This is because when you already have a finished basement, the pros will need to do demolition at the beginning of the project, which can add $500–$1,500 to overall costs.
If a homeowner is seeking to make basic changes in order to renovate a basement, then it can cost as little as $1,000 - $6,000. This means the walls and floor will be waterproofed, then carpet, wall panels, upgraded flooring or improved lighting might be added to make a basement feel like a living space. The cost will depend on the initial shape of a basement, how many upgrades are made and whether or not a contractor is hired to make certain installations.
If a homeowner is seeking to make basic changes in order to renovate a basement, then it can cost as little as $1,000 - $6,000. This means the walls and floor will be waterproofed, then carpet, wall panels, upgraded flooring or improved lighting might be added to make a basement feel like a living space. The cost will depend on the initial shape of a basement, how many upgrades are made and whether or not a contractor is hired to make certain installations.
If you want to increase the amount of living space in your home, remodeling your basement makes a lot more sense than adding on a new addition. A finished basement has an ROI of around 70%, making it one of the better investments you can make in your home. A typical basement remodel costs around $90 a square foot, assuming moderate decor and finishes. With the average project size of 600 square feet, this puts the cost of the average basement remodel around $55,000.
Maybe it’s just great extra space, a blank palette—there are so many awesome ways you can use the basement. A movie room, game room, family room or kitchenette can provide a special place for the family to bond and have fun. Man caves and/or woman caves have become trendy and there are plenty of modern basement cave ideas available to inspire your own private space.

Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.

Wine requires proper storage, and transforming basements into wine cellar is putting this extra living space of your house in to good use. Choose wood which are good in quality having resistance to rot and decay, durable and requires only a mineral oil finish; such as redwood, mahogany, walnut or cypress. Stone floors are the excellent flooring system you can install for your basement wine cellars because they are strong and durable. Granite countertop is a good combination as well.

When finishing a basement, it’s smart to use materials that can stand up to water and moisture. Conventional materials like drywall, wood framing, and MDF moldings are not necessarily the best choices in below-grade applications. That’s why several companies offer complete basement finishing systems that include waterproof wall panels, moisture-proof drop ceilings, mold-proof PVC moldings and water-resistant underfloor systems; everything to reduce the risk from water damage.

Linoleum is another environmentally friendly flooring option for basements. Homeowners looking for numerous design options and ease of maintenance will enjoy linoleum. Drawbacks include a tendency to stain because of its porous nature and a lack of warmth under the feet. This flooring material is durable, but when damage does occur, repairs can be difficult.
The approximate costs and value of a typical Basement Remodeling project are summarized below. Use higher estimates for larger metropolitan areas and the lower estimates where home prices are below the national average. Adjust costs for substitutions or refinements in the last section. For size differences of up to 25%, scale total costs in direct proportion to the size of your project. Use the adjusted costs as a basis for setting a material budget and for comparing contractor bids (if you choose to have a professional perform the work).
Take a basement spare bedroom one step further by turning your downstairs into an apartment suite. Go with a kitchenette with updated appliances and an island, a small space to put a couch for lounging, a half wall to create the boundaries of a bedroom, and a bathroom. You can rent the space out to earn some extra money, or let your college kids stay there in between living arrangements and jobs.
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