When it comes to basement remodels, the most costly way is to start with bare bones. If all you have is concrete walls and floors, you need to add framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring and trim. Basement finishing in a newer home that already has plumbing and electrical roughed in, a watertight foundation and some insulation installed—but no final finishes (like drywall or paint or carpet)—usually costs less than remodeling an already finished basement. This is because when you already have a finished basement, the pros will need to do demolition at the beginning of the project, which can add $500–$1,500 to overall costs.

This practice basement room is haven for the music lovers, a retreat to express yourself through music and perfect place for a much-needed privacy and band practice. Complete with drum set, keyboard and a collection of different types of guitars, are instruments which make it possible for beautiful songs to be composed and played to the musician’s heart content.
This beautiful luxurious wine cellar basement with dining table is a haven for wine lover homeowners and their guest to enjoy and unwind. This wine cellar innovation is an efficient and proper way to store and keep vintage wine collection. Traditional custom made cabinetry with natural wood finish is the best choice for this wine cellar; it is designed to prevent airborne contaminants to spoil those vintage wines. The coffered ceiling with recessed lights, crystal chandelier and patterned flooring complete the traditional rustic style.
Finished basement made use of existing materials and transformed it into an elegant basement living room. Painted concrete floors and concrete hollow blocks walls are painted in classic white and cool gray. Exposed beams are furnished with industrial lights which provide ample lights to the room. Comfy, soft upholstered sofas and accent chair in neutral colors adds coziness, perfect place to sit back and relax. Splash of patterns and colors from the area rug, accent chair and throw pillows gives a warm and welcoming ambiance.
When putting a wall over a recently constructed frame, sheetrock is the industry standard for a durable option, that can be painted easily. It can help insulate the room due to its density and generally lasts a long time when maintained. If you’re trying to significantly drive down costs, using paneling for the walls is an effective option. It’s very light, inexpensive and pre-finished in a variety of different sizes and types. Labor costs may also decrease because paneling is easier to transport and work with.

What better feature to include in your basement plans than a home theater. Basements often have little to no windows, making the dark space ideal for that movie theater vibe. Raise the floor to add rows of recliners, invest in recessed fixtures with soft lighting you can dim, and swap out large a TV for a projector and screen. Whatever your style may be, there are tons of home theater ideas for you try!

In most cases, your HVAC system should already extend to the basement. If not, however, plan on running additional ducts or vents to ensure the finished rooms are adequately heated. Running new ductwork through your basement will cost around $2,000. Radiant heat is another option for basements, as it can be controlled separately and used only when the basement is. Radiant heat costs around $6,000 - $14,000 depending on the method used.


Stucco can be applied directly to cinderblocks, and the process is fairly easy. Since masonry walls are strong, a support system is not required. All that is needed is application of a concrete bonding agent. Traditional application requires a scratch coat, brown coat and finish coat. Advantages of stucco include the unique patterns and textures that can be created to add interest to the basement space. The material is durable and able to accept numerous colors.
Get estimates from several companies; request and check references. Understand exactly what is (and isn't) included in each estimate, and whether the contractor will do the paperwork for required building permits. Ask about the contractor's length and type of experience, especially if there's anything unusual about your project. Be sure a company is properly bonded and insured and licensed in your state[10] . See if there are any complaints with the Better Business Bureau[11] .
Are you thinking about finally completing your unfinished basement? While the average basement remodel cost is around $6,500 to $18,500, the return on investment can be up to 69%. That means having a finished basement is not only great for entertaining guests, but it’s also incredibly profitable for you because it’s a home feature buyers want. Here are some basement remodeling ideas to help you get started!
The following list includes major work tasks commonly performed during Basement Remodeling. Use this list to understand the timing and sequence of different steps in the Basement Remodeling project. Click any Task name for a complete written specifications, FAQs and quality checklist for the task - this essential information will help you control Basement Remodeling project cost and quality.
Homeowners in search of a warm, professional look for their basements often turn to drywall. Drywall ceilings help the basement look as good as upstairs living areas. Drywall can be treated with a variety of textures that are applied by roller or spray applicator. One difficulty associated with drywall ceilings is the necessity of framing in duct work.
If you want to increase the amount of living space in your home, remodeling your basement makes a lot more sense than adding on a new addition. A finished basement has an ROI of around 70%, making it one of the better investments you can make in your home. A typical basement remodel costs around $90 a square foot, assuming moderate decor and finishes. With the average project size of 600 square feet, this puts the cost of the average basement remodel around $55,000.
Bedrooms – A common strategy is to set up a couple of extra bedrooms in the basement for guests. This is especially beneficial for families that love to entertain on a regular basis. You can easily have guests stay over without disrupting the family space above. Basement bedrooms can also come in handy if you have older kids that cannot share bedrooms any more. Plus, you could also add a small kitchenette and bathroom for convenience.
Do-it-yourselfers looking to save some money will want to consider basement wall panels made of magnesium oxide, like those from Wahoo Walls. When adhered to polystyrene insulation, MgO boards insulate to R-11. They are well-suited to damp areas, are mold- and mildew-resistant, and are easy to cut and install. Plus, they can be painted. The boards install in L-shaped steel brackets screwed to the slab and joists, which have pre-cut wiring and cable channels. Panels for interior partitions are also available without the insulation. The company offers excellent installation instructions.

In many cases, a below-slab perimeter drain leading to a sump pit with at least two pumps (primary and backup) is the answer. The sump pit should be installed in the lowest part of the room perimeter and set-up to discharge water outside in the most efficient manner. Many finished basements build a closet around the sump pit. Regardless of how you conceal it, be sure to allow for easy access.
Local planning departments usually have specific regulations on ceiling height, access doors, radon ventilation, waterproofing and other details of the basement remodeling process. Many building codes now require upgrades such as residential fire sprinklers for new construction or major remodeling projects. Ask about local requirements and get all required permits (or make sure the contractor does this). Depending on the location, permit costs can be next to nothing or extremely expensive; find out exactly what they are and include them in the project's budget.
Finishing a basement can cost between $25–$50 per square foot on average, depending on how the basement is finished, whether any challenges come up or whether there are special circumstances with the project. For this reason, a 1,000-square-foot basement can cost up to $50,000 or more to finish. Virgil Miranda of Virgil Miranda’s Construction, a general contracting company based in New Bedford, Massachusetts, says it can be tricky to estimate remodeling jobs based on square footage alone, due to the variance in each job. Larger basements may have a lower cost per square foot than tiny remodel jobs.
Basements are ideal for casual social activities for the whole family, or just for the kids. It's the perfect spot for the big screen TV, pool table, and to stash board games and craft supplies. Make this space inviting by finishing and decorating it like any upstairs room. Choose comfortable furnishings that can be easily rearranged to accommodate a few people or a crowd. Incorporate sound systems, internet connections, and good lighting to make the basement design functional.
While basements get a bad rap at times, if built finished out or remodeled later on, they actually offer a wealth of extra living space for many purposes and activities. For instance, a media room, living room, wine cellar, wet bar, gym, office, playroom, man's cave, laundry and guest room are all popular choices for basement spaces. If you are lucky enough to live in an area where basements are a commonly built element of most homes, you may just be sitting on a myriad of abundant new living possibilities! We've included some of our favorite basement remodeling ideas and images below. Which do you like best?
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